Worried About Mastering All Marketing Channels? Don’t Be.

Are you struggling to be everywhere at once? Perhaps you’re lacking the personnel to maintain a robust LinkedIn page and like-inducing Facebook fodder. Maybe you can’t find enough quality content to build a bustling blog and support a stream of socially savvy Reddit posts. Or, you simply may not have the time to make your direct mail strategies and lists a success.

Regardless of your problem area, the real issue may not be with your business, but with the channel itself.

Master of none
What if we told you that you don’t have to be everywhere at once? Or, worse, that trying to navigate every channel may actually be bad for business?

For years, the trend in marketing has been to be present and active on as many channels as possible. The idea being that by casting a wider net, you’re more likely to catch the eyes of a greater number of people.

Unfortunately, more people doesn’t always equate to more prospects. Investing in channels that aren’t a good fit has spread many companies’ time and marketing budgets thin, squarely landing them in the proverbial situation of becoming a “Jack of all trades, master of none.”

Find your audience
So, it’s time to ask yourself, where is your audience?

To find out, develop personas that delve into where your ideal customer would interact with your brand. Combine that knowledge with tangible sales figures to identify which channels are worthwhile for your business.

It sounds simple, but investing your time, budget, and staff in a few select channels — and abandoning the ones that are targeting the wrong people and providing negligible returns — will result in more engaged customers and dependable sales.

For instance, if you have a dedicated blog audience, then put your energy into developing interactive posts, boosting SEO, and sharing your content. Similarly, if you have a committed catalog following, then focus on making your readers’ experiences top-notch by offering perks like digital editions, augmented reality, and QR codes.

As is the case with most things in life, it’s better to do a few things really well than it is to do a lot of things not-so-well. It’s time to make your most successful marketing channels shine.

About the Author: Jim Gibbs

Vice President of Sales & Marketing at The Dingley Press. Jim has been with Dingley since 2002 and lives in Maine near our Lisbon, Maine plant location.